Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Monday, 03 / 08 / 2021

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Table of Contents

Original Article

Clinical Factors Associated with Hepatocellular Iron Deposition in End-stage Liver Disease
Amelia Fierro-Fine, Leana Guerin, Hasan Hicsasmaz, Kyle E. Brown
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 231-239 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00022

Autotaxin: An Early Warning Biomarker for Acute-on-chronic Liver Failure
Caiyun Nie, Lei Zhang, Xiaobing Chen, Ying Li, Fushuang Ha, Hua Liu, Tao Han
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 240-245 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00045

Liver Dysfunction and Its Association with the Risk of Death in COVID-19 Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study
Lin Fu, Jun Fei, Shen Xu, Hui-Xian Xiang, Ying Xiang, Biao Hu, Meng-Die Li, Fang-Fang Liu, Ying Li, Xiu-Yong Li, Hui Zhao, De-Xiang Xu
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 246-254 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00043

Efficacy and Safety of All-oral Emitasvir and Sofosbuvir in Patients with Genotype 1b HCV Infections without Cirrhosis
Maorong Wang, Wen Xie, Yingjie Ma, Jun Quan, Xuebing Yan, Ping An, Feng Lin, Jidong Jia, Xiaoxuan Hu, Zuojiong Gong, Jie Wu, Yongping Chen, Zhansheng Jia, Minghua Lin, Guiqiang Wang, Yueyong Zhu, Yingjun Zhang, Hongming Xie, Lin Luo, Qingyun Ren, Rui Huang, Lai Wei
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 255-261 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00031

Changing Population of Liver Transplant Recipients in the Era of Direct-acting Antiviral Therapy
Chencheng Xie, Yong-Fang Kuo, Ashwani K. Singal
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 262-266 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2019.00032

Efficacy and Safety of Glecaprevir/Pibrentasvir for Chronic Hepatitis C Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Hong-Qin Xu, Chun-Guang Wang, Peng Xiao, Yan-Hang Gao
Abstract] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 267-276 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00047

Histological Outcome of Fuzheng Huayu plus Entecavir Combination Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients with Significant Liver Fibrosis
Hong-lian Gui, Chang-qing Zhao, Yan Wang, Hong-tu Gu, Wei-jing Wang, Wei Cai, Qing Guo, Shi-san Bao, Lie-ming Xu, Qing Xie
Abstract] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 277-284 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00004

Analysis of Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Young Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Hepatectomy
Chuan Li, Kang Chen, Xu Liu, Hao-Tian Liu, Xiu-Mei Liang, Guang-Lan Liang, Shao-Tong Tang, Rong-Rui Huo, Liang Ma, Bang-Be Xiang, Jian-Hong Zhong, Le-Qun Li
Abstract [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 285-291 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00021

Predicting Infiltrative Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Outcome Post-TACE: MR Bias Field Correction Effect on 3D-quantitative Image Analysis
Cuihong Liu, Susanne Smolka, Xenophon Papademetris, Duc Do Minh, Geliang Gan, Yanhong Deng, MingDe Lin, Julius Chapiro, Ximing Wang, Christos Georgiades, Kelvin Hong
Abstract] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 292-298 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00054

Employment and Patient Satisfaction after Liver Transplantation
Christopher Cao, Dina Halegoua-DeMarzio, Shady Guirguis, Crystal Chen, Jonathan M. Fenkel, Steven Herrine
Abstract] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 267-276 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00047

Review Article

Antihepatic Fibrosis Drugs in Clinical Trials
Yue-Cheng Guo, Lun-Gen Lu
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 304-312 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00023

HEV and HBV Dual Infection: A Review
Myra Nasir, George Y. Wu
Abstract] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 313-321 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00030

Review of Clinically Relevant Drug Interactions with Next Generation Hepatitis C Direct-acting Antiviral Agents
Jenny Hong, Robert C. Wright, Nilu Partovi, Eric M. Yoshida, Trana Hussaini
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 322-335 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00034

Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Overlap Syndrome: A Review
Sheena Mago, George Y. Wu
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 336-346 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00036

Hypothyroidism and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathophysiological Associations and Therapeutic Implications
Tomislav Kizivat, Ivana Maric, Dunja Mudri, Ines Bilic Curcic, Dragan Primorac, Martina Smolic
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 347-353 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00027

Letter to the Editor

Revised Nomenclature for Fatty Liver Disease: Cutting through the Confusion
Khalid Alsawat, Almoutaz Hashim, Mohamed Alboraie, Yasser Fouad
Abstract ] [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ] 354-355 Doi: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00049

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Revised Nomenclature for Fatty Liver Disease: Cutting through the Confusion

Khalid Alsawat1, Almoutaz Hashim2, Mohamed Alboraie3 and Yasser Fouad*,4 

1  Liver Research Center, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2  Department of Medicine, University of Jeddah, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3  Department of Internal Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
4  Department of Gastroenterology and Endemic Medicine, Minia University, Minia, Egypt
*Correspondence to: Yasser Fouad, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Endemic Medicine Department, Minia University, Main Road, Minia 11432, Egypt. Tel: +201091318555, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2020;8(3):354-355 DOI: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00049
Received: May 28, 2020 Accepted: August 27, 2020 Published online: September 21, 2020

Abstract

Numerous clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) were identified with the newer generation DAAs and commonly prescribed drugs. NS3/4A protease inhibitors are more likely to be involved in DDIs, followed by NS5A inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitor. The majority of clinically relevant DDIs are predictable, according to known pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamics, and physicochemical properties of DAAs; however, in select cases, unpredictable DDIs do occur. As expected, many drug interactions exist between newer generation DAAs and commonly prescribed medications. While the majority of clinically relevant interactions are predictable, many require therapeutic dose adjustment or careful selection of non-interacting drugs. In select cases, severe and unpredictable drug interactions can occur. Clinicians should consult hepatitis C virus pharmacotherapy experts and tertiary drug interaction resources when initiating DAA therapy in patients taking other medications.Nomenclature of disease is pivotal for both clinicians and patients, as well as for other stakeholders, and serves as a critical nosological reference point. The term ‘non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)’ was introduced to a broader audience by Ludwig and colleagues in 1980.1 The authors coined this term, trying to describe a clinical entity from fatty liver disease that is not caused by increased alcohol intake. In their description and subsequent guidelines, it was pointed out that diagnosis is based on the exclusion of significant alcohol intake and other liver diseases.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2020 vol. 8, 354-355  [ Html  ] [ PDF Full-text ]

© The Authors 2020. This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license.

REVIEW ARTICLE

Hypothyroidism and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathophysiological Associations and Therapeutic Implications

Tomislav Kizivat#,1,2, Ivana Maric1,2, Dunja Mudri1,2, Ines Bilic Curcic#,1,2, Dragan Primorac1,3,4,5,6,7,8 and Martina Smolic*,1,8 

1  University of Osijek, Faculty of Medicine, Osijek, Croatia
2  University Hospital Osijek, Osijek, Croatia
3  St Catherine Specialty Hospital, Zagreb & Zabok, Croatia
4  University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia
5  Eberly College of Science, State College, Penn State University, PA, USA
6  The Henry C Lee College of Criminal Justice & Forensic Sciences, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT, USA
7  University of Rijeka School of Medicine, Rijeka, Croatia
8  University of Osijek Faculty of Dental Medicine & Health, Osijek, Croatia
#Both authors contributed equally to this manuscript.
*Correspondence to: Martina Smolic, University of Osijek, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology; Faculty of Dental Medicine and Health, Department of Pharmacology and Biochemistry, J. Huttlera 4, 31000 Osijek, Croatia. Tel: +385-31-512-800, Fax: +385-31-512-833, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2020;8(3):347-353 DOI: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00027
Received: April 7, 2020 Accepted: June 28, 2020 Published onlineJuly 21, 2020

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a complex clinical entity which can be secondary to many other diseases including hypothyroidism, characterized by lowering of thyroid hormones and increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). A lot of emerging data published recently advocates the hypothesis that hypothyroid induced NAFLD could be a separate clinical entity, even suggesting possible treatment options for NAFLD involving substitution therapy for hypothyroidism along with lifestyle modifications. In addition, a whole new field of research is focused on thyromimetics in NAFLD/NASH treatment, currently in phase 3 clinical trials. In this critical review we summarized epidemiological and pathophysiological evidence linking these two clinical entities and described specific treatment options with the accent on promising new agents in NAFLD treatment, specifically thyroid hormone receptor (THR) agonist and its metabolites.

Keywords

NAFLD, MAFLD, Hypothyroidism, Metabolic syndrome, Thyromimetics

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2020 vol. 8, 347-353  [ Html  ] [ PDF Full-text ]

© The Authors 2020. This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license.

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