Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Thursday, 05 / 13 / 2021

Articles

REVIEW ARTICLE

Celiac Disease and Elevated Liver Enzymes: A Review

Jaimy Villavicencio Kim*,1 and George Y. Wu2

1  Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA
2  Division of GastroenterologyHepatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA​
*Correspondence to: Jaimy Villavicencio Kim, Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Ave, Farmington, CT 06032, USA. Tel: +1-860-899-8739, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2021;9(1):116-124 DOI: 10.14218/JCTH.2020.00089
Received: September 20, 2020 Accepted: November 17, 2020 Published online: December 7, 2020

Abstract

Aminotransferases are commonly found to be elevated in patients with celiac disease in association with two different types of liver dysfunction: cryptogenic liver disorders and autoimmune disorders. The purpose of this review is to discuss the mechanisms by which aminotransferases become elevated in celiac disease, clinical manifestations, and response to gluten-free diet. Many studies have shown that celiac patients with cryptogenic liver disease have normalization in aminotransferases, intestinal histologic improvement and serologic resolution after 6–12 months of strict gluten-free diet. In patients with an underlying autoimmune liver disease, simultaneous treatment for both conditions resulted in normalized elevated aminotransferases. The literature suggests that intestinal permeability may be at least one of the mechanisms by which liver damage occurs. Patients with celiac disease should have liver enzymes routinely checked and treated with a strict gluten-free diet if found to be abnormal. Lack of improvement in patients who have strictly adhered to gluten-free diet should prompt further workup for other causes of liver disease.

Keywords

Celiac disease, Gluten free diet, Celiac hepatitis, Autoimmune liver disease

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2021 vol. 9, 116-124  [ Html  ] [ PDF Full-text ]

© The Author(s) 2021. This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license.

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