Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Thursday, 05 / 13 / 2021

Articles

Abstract

EDITORIAL

A Simple and Rapid Method for Quantitative Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Drug-resistant Mutations

Ran Wang and Zhengde Xie*

Beijing Key Laboratory of Pediatric Respiratory Infectious Diseases, Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Ministry of Education, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Diseases, Research Unit of Critical Infection in Children, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 2019RU016, Laboratory of Infection and Virology, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, Beijing, China
*Correspondence to: Zhengde Xie, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, 56 Nan Li Shi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045, China. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7634-9338 .Tel: +86-10-5961-6892, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2021;9(2):139-140 DOI: 10.14218/JCTH.2021.00135
Received: April 6, 2021 Accepted: April 12, 2021 Published online: April 16, 2021

 

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small-enveloped virus enclosing a partially double-stranded DNA genome, belongs to the hepadnaviruses family.1To date, 10 genotypes (A–J) of HBV with distinct geographical distribution have been described, based on a divergence of at least 8% over the entire genomic sequence or >4% in the S gene sequence, with B and C being most prevalent and confined to Asia and Oceania.2 HBV is a highly contagious pathogen that can lead to acute infection or chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (commonly known as HCC) in humans through immune anergy or upon immunosuppression.3

 

Although a global HBV vaccination program has been implemented in more than 200 countries and provided a significant decline in incidence of CHB, there are still approximately 292 million people worldwide suffering from CHB, with close to 1 million deaths occurring annually and maintaining the disease as a major global health problem.4,5 Large-scale long-term prospective studies in the past decades have shown that antiviral nucleotide analogues (NAs) treatment of CHB patients may inhibit HBV replication without eliminating the virus, remitting HBV-related HCC in some patients and reducing associated morbidity and mortality but not completely.6 Due to potent viral suppressive effects and good tolerance by patients taking the NAs for decades while experiencing limited side effects, these drugs have been widely used in the management of CHB treatment.7

 

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2021 vol. 9, 139-140  [ Html  ] [ PDF Full-text ]

© 2021 Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the  Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License(CC BY-NC 4.0), permitting all non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

 

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